Animal Control and Wildlife Management 

The Health Department provides an animal control and disease surveillance program. Free rabies inoculations are provided to dogs and cats once a year in the fall. Companion, domestic and wild animal complaints are investigated by the Township's full-time Animal Control Officer. Animal bites to humans or pets are followed up in accordance with applicable state regulations and potentially rabid animals are delivered to the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services' biological laboratory for prompt testing. The Health Department also provides the Township of West Caldwell's residents and businesses with important information about animal risks and behaviors, pest control, and the insect and rodent disease vectors present in our area.

Site Map

Animal Control Services Provided To West Caldwell Residents

Rabies Vaccination Clinics

License, When Required

License, Fees

Services Provided 

Adoptable Pets

Services Not Provided

Deceased Wildlife 

Animal Cruelty

Wildlife Management

Wildlife Information

Wildlife Disease Information

Additional Links

Animal Control Services Provided To West Caldwell Residents

The Township of West Caldwell Health Department strives to provide the best public health services to its citizens to improve the well-being of the public, including animals. The Animal Control Officers of the Montville Township Health Department (our Township’s Shared Service Provider) are compassionate animal welfare professionals. Animal Control Officers enforce local and regional laws concerning the care and treatment of animals and educate the public about animal control safety. Officers often respond to calls from citizens about stray animals and suspected animal cruelty. Sometimes, officers have to capture or rescue animals, but other times administer warnings or citations to citizens suspected of animal cruelty and mistreatment. Montville’s Animal Control Officers possess superior attention to detail and knowledge of New Jersey sheltering, animal control laws and regulations, animal health, animal well-being, including nutritional needs, resources for information, knowledge of common animal disease and treatments, skills in animal first-aid, and CPR.

Rabies Vaccination Clinics

The West Caldwell Health Department offers free rabies clinics for dogs/cats once a year (fall). The schedule for the West Caldwell Health Department Free Rabies Vaccination Clinics is: 

(Please have cats in carriers and dogs on leashes)

West Caldwell
Saturday, November 11, 2017 
900 am to 11:00 am
Public Works Garage
21 Clinton Rd. (behind the Police Station)

Fairfield
Saturday, November 18, 2017
9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.
Public Works Garage
230 Fairfield Rd.

License, When Required

The Township of West Caldwell requires that all dogs of licensing age be licensed and inoculated with rabies vaccine. Under local ordinance 9-2.1 - License, When Required, Licenses shall be required for the following dogs of licensing age:

a) Any dog owned or kept within the township by a resident of the township on the first day of January of any calendar year.

b) Any dog acquired by any person during the course of any calendar year and kept within the township for more than ten (10) days after acquisition.

c) Any dog attaining licensing age during the course of the calendar year.

d) Any unlicensed dog brought into the township by any person and kept within the township for more than ten (10) days.

e) Any dog licensed by another state brought into the township by any person and kept within the township for more than ninety (90) days. (1993 Code § 86-2A)

License, Fees

The person applying for a license shall pay a fee of sixteen dollars and twenty ($16.20) cents for each dog. He shall also pay a fee of three ($3.00) dollars for each non-altered dog. The person shall receive a license tag for each dog. The replacement fee for a lost tag will be one ($1.00) dollar. The same fees shall be charged for the annual renewal of each license and registration tag. License must be renewed annually by January 31 each year. (1993 Code § 83-4; Ord. No. 1566 § 1)

Services Provided 

The following are services that Montville Township Animal Control offers to Township residents.

  • They will trap ONLY for suspected rabid animals.
  • They accept animals at the Montville Animal Shelter, located at 7 Church Lane in Montville, our phone number is 973-334-6410. We are open for adoptions Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 11:00am and 3:30 pm to 4:30 pm, on Saturdays from 10:00 am to 12:00 p,m. and by appointment on Sundays.

The Montville Township Animal Shelter has a wide variety of dogs, puppies, cats, and kittens that are all patiently awaiting a happy and loving home. Please come meet them! A full list of their adoptable pets on Petfinder can be found on the following link: Petfinder

Services Not Provided

The Montville Township Animal Control Officer is unable to do the following:

  • We do not trap for nuisance wildlife (ex. groundhogs eating vegetables, foxes, deer, coyotes)
  • We do not pick up dead animals on private property

Deceased Wildlife 

For deceased animals on Township roadways, please call the West Caldwell Department of Public Works at 973-226-2300 during regular business hours. After hours, holidays, or weekends, please call 973-226-4114.

For deceased animals on County roadways, please call the County of Essex Department of Public Works at 973.226.8500 during regular business hours. After hours, holidays, or weekends, please call 973-226-4114.

Animal Cruelty

Prior to calling Animal Control Officers, please look for the following signs if you suspect an animal is in danger.

How to recognize the Physical Signs of Animal Cruelty/ASPCA:

Collar so tight that it causes a neck wound
Open wounds, signs of multiple healed wounds
Extreme thinness or emaciation-bones may be visible
Signs of inadequate grooming, such as extreme matting of fur, overgrown nails and dirty coat
An owner striking or otherwise physically abusing an animal

How to recognize the Environmental Signs of Animal Cruelty/ASPCA:

Pets are tied up alone outside for long periods of time without food or water
Pets are kept outside in inclement weather without access to adequate shelter
Pets are kept in an area littered with feces, garbage, broken glass or other objects that could harm them
If you believe you have witnessed animal abuse in the State of New Jersey and would like to report it, please call NJSPCA at 800-582-5979.

Wildlife Management

Despite being the most densely populated state in the nation, and the fifth smallest in area, New Jersey provides habitat for an incredible number and diversity of wildlife species. There are more than 400 species of vertebrate wildlife which can be found within the state, due in large part to the state's geographic position within North America, as well as 134 freshwater fish and 336 marine finfish.

The Division of Fish and Wildlife is responsible for all wildlife in New Jersey. Management of both game and nongame species includes the common goals of protecting and managing habitats and wildife populations and maintaining wildlife diversity. This work has restored populations of wild turkey and peregrine falcons, as well as bald eagles and osprey. Beavers are again widespread, as are coyotes, and even secretive bobcat have extended their range in the state.

Wildlife management in the state is not without challenges, but even with the threat of habitat loss confronting many species, proper management has allowed our wildlife to thrive. This in turn provides enormous economic and recreational benefits to the people of the state.

The links below will help you learn more about New Jersey's wildlife resources and the various policies the govern their management.

Wildlife Information

Black Bears in New Jersey

Coyotes in New Jersey

 Foxes in New Jersey

White-tailed Deer in New Jersey

Wild Turkey in New Jersey

 

Wildlife Disease Information

Chronic Wasting Disease Information

Mange in Fox and Coyote

Reporting Dead or Sick Wildlife

Additional Links

Wildlife Rehabilitators

Don't Feed the Wildlife

Caution: Feeding Waterfowl May Be Harmful!

NJDFW Wildlife Relocation Policy